ABOUT BUYING ART

GOOD EARTH original tea — the one with cinnamon — is my very favorite. When it’s fresh there’s nothing better in the morning for someone who cannot drink caffeine! A few years ago, this bit of tea bag wisdom struck my fancy…

“WHY SHOULD I BUY EXPENSIVE ART WHEN I CAN MAKE MY OWN”
         — Piero Milani, (an artist born in Italy who is perhaps most famous for this quote)

As an artist wanting to sell my work, I’m not overjoyed by the concept…
But I understand Piero’s thinking. My collection is only budding. Hopefully, over time, it will contain more art that others have made. Why? Because it brings me joy! 

Here’s a painting I bought from my son, Dane. It’s bound to be a great investment! Check out Dane’s web site for more examples of his art.

The graphite pieces above my kitchen window, made by Vic Thomas, a favorite art instructor READ ABOUT THEM. Artwork by my sons. And this piece by my friend Susan Gorrie, “René’s Tuscan Cherry Jam” which was inspired by our Italy trip last May. Yes, I did climb the tree to pick the cherries! It means so much to me.

Fortunately, there are people who value art and are willing to invest in it!
You might enjoy this piece from local art writer Duane Snider about collecting art in Portland

“I thought I couldn’t afford fine art. I needed justification for spending that much money on an object of such subjective value. I feared I didn’t have the knowledge or experience to make good judgments about what I wanted. I felt intimidated by the abstract nature of what constituted quality art.”

And this, from his second essay:

“In Portland, unlike in larger cities, one doesn’t need lots of money to afford a very nice personal collection. Local galleries do a good job making art accessible to anyone who has even modest amounts of disposable income. Many local galleries have liberal layaway policies that help new customers start collecting.
In recent years galleries have been opening outside the traditional art districts with a focus on quality work by emerging artists generally priced under $1,000 – with many works from $100 to $500. This profusion of affordable art is the element that makes the Portland market irresistible to the experienced collector and surprisingly accommodating to the novice.”